Female Alopecia – Information, Causes, Prevention, and Treatment Options

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Female Alopecia

 

1.-Introduction

2.-Growth cycles

3.-Main Causes

4.-Secondary Causes

5.-Topical treatments

6.-Oral treatments

7.-Cosmetic treatments

8.-Conclusion

 

Introduction

While advertising for products that “strengthen the hair” are always male-oriented, it may seem that women do not suffer from alopecia. The reality is that over five thirds of women face the challenges of hair-loss at some point in their lives.

With different colors, styles and variations, young propecia generic or mature, male or female, the hair has an important role in a person’s picture.

For some women, hair loss can be genetic; however, lots of of the causes of female hair loss are treatable.

Lots of women find this disturbing, perhaps over men. In addition, the female physiology is distinctive, and factors such as menstrual cycles, pregnancy and menopause are important.

 

Hair structure:

Without a doubt, the physical appearance of women depends greatly on their hair. For lots of women, their hair is a sign of youth and vitality.

The average head has 100,000 hairs. At the base of the follicle buy clomid online without a prescription is the oval shaped root, which is responsible for the growth of hair. In the lower portion of this is the papilla, which contains blood capillaries that provide blood to each hair.

The external portion of the hair, called the stem, is the part of the hair that they see and style. In reality it is dead tissue produced by hair follicles, small bag-shaped structures located deep in the scalp. Each hair is enclosed within a follicle.

As hair grows, the cells move towards the surface of the skin and become a protein called keratin, being replaced by new cells. Keratin is the same protein found in the nails.

The stem is composed of 3 layers: the cuticle, the cortex and medulla. The cuticle, or outer layer, consists of small cells known as scales. The cuticle serves as a case for the cortex, the thickest portion of the stem, composed of cells arranged in the form of tobacco leaves. The cortex holds the pigment that gives hair its color. The medulla is composed of cells with the form of a case and is located in the center. The spaces between cells in the medulla influence the refraction of light in tone and hair.

 

Glands and muscles

The hair is lubricated by oily secretions from the sebaceous glands, located on the sides of most follicles. Surrounding these glands and the rest of the follicle, there’s groups of muscles (arrector pili) that permit the hair to stand up when a person is cold or afraid.

The average head has 100,000 hairs. Hair grows and is renewed regularly. Normally, 50 to 100 hairs fall out every day. If there’s no problems, this loss will most likely go un-noticed.

 

Cycles of growth

As the hair falls out is replaced by a new hair from the hair follicle, located under the skin. Throughout a person’s life span no new hair follicles are formed. Blonds have the most hair (140,000 hairs) followed by dark hair (105,000) and red hair (90,000). As they age the rate of hair growth diminishes, leading to a progressive thinning of hair. Since the hair is composed of protein (keratin), and this material is also in the nails, it is essential that all people ingest or eat an abundant amount of protein to maintain the healthy hair production. Protein is found in meat, poultry, fish, eggs, milk, cheese, cereals, nuts and soy.

Hair grows about 1 cm per month, although this growth declines as they age. Every hair on your head remains there for about five to five years, and during most of this time it is growing. When the hair is older it enters a resting stage in which it remains on the head, but stops growing. At the finish of this phase delivery kamagra the hair falls out. Typically, the follicle replaces the hair in about five months, but lots of factors can disrupt this cycle. The result may be that the hair falls out soon or is not replaced. Normally 90% of hair is in continuous growth (anagen phase) that lasts 2 to 6 years. 10% of hair is in a resting phase, which lasts about 2-3 months. At the finish of this stage it is normal for the hair to fall out (telogen phase).

Androgenetic alopecia is the most common cause of hair loss. It is mainly determined by 3 factors: aging, hormones, and heredity.

 

Main causes

Most people experience some hair loss as they age. The result may be a partial or total baldness. Men are much more likely than women to experience baldness and hair loss when they get older, but “female baldness” can also be inherited, which can cause modest or significant hair loss in women as they age. Hair loss is apparent initially between 25 and 30 years of age. In female hair loss, hair is replaced by increasingly thinner and shorter hair. Hair may even become transparent.

Usually, hair loss in women is less obvious than in men. Also, the pattern in which the hair falls out is different. It is most noticeable in the hair part, as well as the crown of the head, additionally the frontal hair line is retained. It is inherited from both sister and brother.

There also seems to be an immune factor in baldness. Basically, the immune process begins to target hair follicles in the areas of alopecia. The rise in male hormones (DHT) during puberty starts this process.

About 50% of women who experience hair loss have “female baldness”. In these cases there is an abundance of dihydrotestosterone (male hormone) in the hair follicle. The conversion of testosterone to DHT is regulated by the 5-alpha-reductase enzyme in the moneygram scalp. Over time, the action of DHT degrades, and shortens the growth phase of the follicle (Anagen). Although the follicle is technically alive, it grows less and less each time. Some follicles die, but most become smaller and thinner. As the Anagenic Phase remains short, hair gradually thins and falls out until it becomes so fine that it can no longer sustain daily hair combing. Baldness turns a long, thick pigmented hair in to narrow, clear and light hair. Nevertheless, the sebaceous glands attached to the follicle remain the same size and continue to produce the same amount of sebum. When a medical treatment (flutamide, cyproterone or spironolactone) is able to reduce the male hormones, the sebaceous glands become smaller, and reduce their production of this hormone in the sebum causing less destroy.

 

A wide variety of factors can cause hair loss, often temporary, in women:

 

Secondary causes

 

Birth Control Pills

The pills contain five ingredients, a synthetic estrogen and progestin. Women who experience hair loss while taking oral contraceptives are predisposed to a hereditary progressive hair thinning. This can be accelerated by the effects of the male hormone possessing some progestagens. If this happens, it is advisable to alter to another type of oral contraceptive. Also, when a woman stops using definite oral contraceptives, they can be notice hair loss 2-3 months later. This lasts about 6 months and usually ceases. It would be similar to hair loss experienced after giving birth.

Lack of iron causes hair loss in men as well as women. However, in women the problem is more prevalent, in those with long or heavy menstrual cycles. The lack of iron can be detected easily with analysis, and corrected with medical treatment.

 

Iron deficiency anemia

A diet low in protein can also cause hair loss, as can low iron intake. Vegetarians, people with diets low in protein, and patients with anorexia nervosa may be a protein deficient. When this occurs the body helps to conserve protein by shifting hair growth to the resting stage. This can lead to heavy hair loss about 3 months after the hair growth enters the resting stage. When the hair is pulled, it comes out easily at the root. This process is reversible with medical treatment, which requires an adequate intake of protein.

 

Diet

 

Post-partum

Some women lose large amounts of hair 2-3 months after giving birth. When a woman gives birth, lots of hairs enter the resting phase. 2-3 months after they may notice a large number of hairs in the comb or brush after combing her hair. The hair loss can last about 6 months. The problem, in most cases, is resolved after appropriate medical treatment. Not all new mothers will suffer from this experience, and not all women will notice hair loss with each pregnancy.

You may start to lose hair 1-3 months after a stressful situation, such as major surgery. High fevers, infections, severe or chronic diseases can also result in hair loss.

 

Stress and illness

An underactive or hyperactive thyroid can cause hair loss. These diseases are diagnosed by clinical symptoms and laboratory tests. These cases need special handling.

 

Thyroid Disease

 

Medicines

Some drugs used in cancer chemotherapy cause hair cells to stop their division, resulting in thinner more fragile hair that easily breaks as it emerges from the scalp. This phenomenon occurs 1-3 weeks after the start of anticancer treatment. The patient can lose 90% of their hair. In most patients, hair grows back when anticancer treatment ends.

 

Drugs that reduce cholesterol: clofibrate (Atromis-S) and gemfibrozil (Lopid).

rugs for Parkinson’s: levodopa (Dopar, Larodopa).

Anti-ulcer drugs: cimetidine (Tagamet), ranetidina (Zantac) and famotidine (Pepcid).

Anticoagulants: Coumarina and Heparin.

Anti gotoso agents: Allopurinol (Loporin, Zyloprim, Zyloric).

Anti-arthritic: penicillamina, auranofin (Ridaura), indomethacin (Inacid), naproxen (Naprosyn), Sulindac (Clinoril) and methotrexate (Folex).

erivatives of Vitamin-A: isotretinoin (Accutane, Roacutan) and etretinato (Tegison, Tigason).

Anti-convulsants / antiepileptics: trimethadione (Tridion).

Anti-depressants: tricyclics, amphetamines.

Beta blockers for hypertension: atenolol (Tenormin), metoprolol (Lopressor), nadolol (Corgard), propranolol (Inderal) and timolol (Blocadren).

Anti-thyroid: carbimazole, iodine, thiocianato, thiouracilo.

Other anticoagulants, male hormones (anabolic steroids).

 

Also, lots of popular medications can cause hair loss.

 

Alopecia Areata

 

A common disease that causes patches of hair loss on the scalp and other body parts. It affects men and women of all ages, but more commonly youth. The affected follicles significantly diminish their production of hair. They become small and produce hair that is not very noticeable. These follicles are in a resting state, and at any time can resume their normal activities after receiving a signal. Some people create only a few bald spots that return to normal in about a year. Some people loose all of the hair on their head (alopecia totalis). In other people all body hair is lost (alopecia universal). It is believed that alopecia areata is an autoimmune disease in which the body mistakenly produces antibodies against the hair follicle (autoallergic). Anxiety and nervousness may trigger the disease or prevent it from healing. Treatment includes injecting cortisone, or by applying Minoxidil, cyclosporine, steroid creams or Anthralin to the affected area. In chosen cases, UVA treatment, or the application of dibenciprona on the lesions is used in order to produce an allergic eczema to stimulate the resting follicle.

 

A fungal infection on the scalp. Small patches can cause flaking and some hair loss.

 

Tinea/ringworm

 

Inappropriate hair care

Lots of women use chemical treatments on their scalp, such as dyes, highlights, and perms. Chemical treatments can destroy the hair if done incorrectly. The hair becomes weak and breaks when these substances are applied often, left on long, bleaching previously bleached hair, or when five or more procedures are performed in the same day. If the hair becomes porous and dull by excessive exposure to chemical treatments, it is advisable to suspend these treatments until the hair has recovered. Shampoo, brushing and combing are necessary for proper care of the hair, but if done excessively or inappropriately can destroy hair, causing it to break at the stalk, or produce split ends. You can use a conditioner or hair repair product after shampoo to reduce the force required to comb the hair and make it more manageable. When there’s split ends, and hair that is difficult to comb, it is advisable to use hair repair products with silicone serums. Excess water should not be dried and rubbed vigorously with a towel. When the hair is wet its structure is more fragile, and vigorous combing or brushing should be avoided. Forget the elderly recommendation of combing or brushing in excess as well, because it damages hair. Use combs with widely spaced teeth and narrow bristle brushes, preferably natural (wild boar bristle brushes for example). The hairstyles that need tension on the hair like curls and braids should be alternated with loose hair styles to avoid the constant “pull” that can produce hair loss, on the sides of the scalp.

 

1. Minoxidil. Is a vasodilator agent that has been used orally in the treatment of hypertension and is now widely used in treating various types of alopecia. In general, 1 ml of lotion is applied five time a day (every 12 hours) to dry hair, as humidity increases the penetration of the product several times. Works better in young men than in women (20 years), in those with mild hair loss (thinning) on the crown, or a small bald patch 3-4 cm, but also is functional for a receding hairline. The response to Minoxidil varies from individual to individual. Treatment should be 2 to 5 years. The scalp will recover beginning to grow more hair from the small narrow hairs. Minoxidil causes hair becomes thicker and healthier. The outcome is better for people suffering from hair loss for less than 2 years. Most see fuzz growing in the first few months. Some experience more hair loss after the first applications. This is because the elderly hair should fall out in order for new hair to grow. Positive results can be seen in 4-8 months, although the maximum effects of Minoxidil are reached between 12-14 months.

 

Topical Treatments

2. Pyrimidine N-oxides. A generic class of hair tonics similar to Minoxidil (2.4-Diaminopyrimidine Aminexil-3-oxide). The results in over 250 men and women include an 8% increase in hair growth after 6 weeks of treatment, compared to a decrease in the rate of hair growth with a placebo.

3. Tretinoin. Has been used for years in the treatment of acne. It is as well as a hair tonic in appropriate doses, in combination with Minoxidil. If implemented together, first apply the Minoxidil, wait for it to dry (usually 15-30 minutes) and then apply Tretinoin. Tretinoin should be applied only at night. A slight irritation to the skin of the scalp is expected, at the beginning of the treatment.

4. Natural treatments. There’s lots of treatments with vitamins, sulfur amino acids (cysteine, methionine, tiazolidín carboxylic acid), minerals (zinc) and plant extracts (Indian horse chestnut, calendula) tha

5. Topical estrogen. Solutions of dienestrol or progesterone may be applied daily for 6-12 months.

 

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